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Marine Birthday Msgs                                       This page first appeared on this site November 11, 2011
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               This page last updated November 12, 2014


We have placed here messages from Marine Birthdays, in chronological order, as a convenience so folk need not hunt through Archives.  While we do not expect them to change much from one year to the next, there may be some differences, perhaps some of value.  Some years we may just re-publish from an earlier year, though we expect we will generally try to keep The Birthday in perspective yet relevant to current events.

There is a Commandants' Message that is read, unchanged, every year (we'll hunt it down and get in here at some point, for those not familiar with it).
 

There is also traditionally a  new Birthday Salute from GoDaddy each year  -- the Founder of GoDaddy was a Marine --  that has, in our experience, always been worth seeing.
 
 
 

 

 

November 11, 2014

 

 

Veterans Day.

 

Some very large news items of significance came down yesterday [The Marine Corps Birthday].  They suggest very strongly that those who are veterans, who have taken that Oath, may want to review it [you can find it here], remember that there was no expiration date, and rededicate to it [particularly with reference to the part about “all enemies, foreign and domestic”(emphasis added)].

 

One of those biggies in the news is about the new Secty. of the Department of Veterans Affairs.  Seems he may be on to something, with a “short list” of about 35 folk who need to go, and another list of about 1000 more who might well be going in a second round.  Even the idea that the VA could use another 28K doctors and nurses and other healthcare professionals is, from1perspective, good news: it clearly shows that the VA simply could not have been delivering what it should to this countrys’ veterans and that such has in fact been covered up.  It also indicates that something may actually get done about the mess.

Hey, did anybody else notice that the POSIC managed a schedule that gave this little trip to China a greater priority than The Marine Corps Birthday followed by Veterans Day?  We found even the garb chosen by the POSIC…interesting.  Maybe Obama[?] wasn’t even aware of the Birthday or Veterans Day [wouldn’t surprise, would it?] but we’re pretty sure the Chinese were aware.  Add the announcement of the Chinese stealth fighter, which seems an awful lot like one of ours, not so long after announcement(s) that the Chinese are involved in cyber-theft of intellectual property from the USA amounting to perhaps $200 billion a year, and additional information about vulnerabilities of our utilities to cyber-attack….  That POSIC isn’t just an embarrassment, He’s a real liability, even a danger.

Another biggie in the news is, again, related to healthcare, this time in the form of DemoCare[/ObamaCare/ACA…].  The audio/video recording that has surfaced of one of the architects of that fraud is remarkably revealing of both that horrible effort and the administration that has fought tooth and nail to force it on the people of this country.  We think this may well be a death-knell for that impracticality [and perhaps for the Administration as well].  We shall see what we shall see.

 

So, if you are a veteran, or have loved one, please consider these thoughts, and the blog entries dated November 6, 2013 through November 11, 2013 [in the Archive] and the earlier stuff noted there.  And if you are one of those veterans, please consider renewing, at a personal level, your Oath; you may be needed again; perhaps in a different capacity, but needed.

Veterans Day is celebrated on the eleventh day of the eleventh month for a reason.
 
 

 

 
 
November 10, 2012

 

 

 

Happy 237th Birthday, Marines!  

 
 

 

For many people, this is Veterans’ Day weekend.  Many simply do not realize that today, November 10, is something of a High Holy Day to Marines, The Marine Corps Birthday; this time the 237th.  While every Marine is a veteran, not every veteran is a Marine: this is a difference between veterans that is of some consequence.  Not everybody wants to be a Marine; not everybody who wants to, gets a chance at The Title; not all who get the chance, end up winning it.  Marines make up less than 10% of the living vets in this country today, and only a fraction of 1% of the population overall.

The Navy has a birthday in October: the Air Force in mid-September; and the Army shares its birthday with everybody in the country, letting everybody celebrate its birthday as Flag Day.  As far as we know, those birthdays are not seen as anywhere near as big a deal by those services, as The Corps sees its Birthday.

The Marine Corps Birthday is a very big deal for Marines.  It is essentially a High Holy Day in The Corps.  Perhaps because The Corps has played touch-n-go with its own end so many times in its history [and may be about to do so once again, due to budget constraints; budgets have never been kind to The Corps…which could, at least in part, explain why, up to 1970 or so and perhaps beyond, The Corps always ran essentially under budget, returning funds at the end of the year].  The Marine Corps Birthday is observed and celebrated throughout The Corps and even has its own traditions (The Corps is very big on Tradition).

The Marine Corps Birthday is November 10th, making it very easy for most people in this holy-day-at-convenience society to confuse it with Veterans’ Day.  But when folk insist on disrespect for the end of WWI by fudging the date for Armistice Day  -- the original name for that day of observance --  and crowd into November 10th, they are also giving away the Birthday party held for the millions of members of that very special club, United States Marines.

Now, in many families it’s just fine to celebrate a birthday on a day that is not necessarily the specific date but more convenient or practical for the family in general.  Not all families operate that way, but certainly some do.  In such situations, it is usually with the permission of the individual most immediately concerned; the birthday girl or boy.

But The Corps takes The Birthday seriously […or did: some actions in recent years suggest a lapse].  While there have been assorted rewritings of history over time, for nearly a century The Corps has celebrated its birthday in high fashion on November 10th, the day the first Continental Marines came into being at Tun Tavern in 1775 [note: that pre-dates the Declaration of Independence, let alone The Constitution].

In describing The Birthday and its signature event, The Birthday Ball, in his 2001 book "Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines", Marion F. Sturkey wrote (in part):

Like the U.S. Marine Corps itself, the annual Birthday Ball has evolved from simple origins to the polished and professional functions of today. Nonetheless, one thing remains constant, the tenth day of November! This unique holiday for warriors is a day of camaraderie, a day to honor Corps and Country. Throughout the world on 10 November, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps -- the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known.

The case has been made: The Marine Corps Birthday is, and has long been, a big deal, at least to [most] Marines [despite somehow even a Marine General or two apparently missing the memo on occasion].  And the party is for Marines, and their special guests.  It is not for the population at large: not even for veterans at large; it is for Marines.  They  -- seemingly to a man --  look at it very personally as being their own Birthday.

Which is part of why there is sometimes a little disquiet over the dates: November 10th is not November 11th.

Here [PLUSdoesNOTequalAND Publishing], we subscribe to the stuff on this Usann.us site about language being a poor tool but the best we’ve got for communication ["Watch Your Language"]; that we must, as many of our parents taught, "Say what you mean, mean what you say".  In this case, November 11th is Veterans' Day, not to be confused with November 10th, The Marine Corps Birthday.  Each is a specific day, with huge significance in its own right and for its own audience; and each worthy of being noted with respect throughout [this] society at large.

 

 

Happy Birthday, Marines.  Semper Fi.
 
 
 

 

Now, we ask a birthday present of all Marines: please take to wearing, most if not all the time, one or more readily observed Branch of Service emblems; on hats, collars, pockets, belts and/or buckles, watches, bracelets, rings.  With respect, of course; being well-groomed, and not in a way that would pretend support for some commercial endeavor not sanctioned by HQMC.  But "fly your colors".  And when you see them, acknowledge the fact; no big show necessary, a knowing look, a respectful nod, a discrete handshake, a quiet "Semper Fi".

This country desperately needs the strengths of its warriors, and  -- as noted elsewhere on this site --  the oath of enlistment [and the corresponding one for officers] carries no expiration date.  "Once a Marine, Always a Marine" is not a trite nonsense but the obligation willingly accepted that goes along with The Title, earned.  [The one around here says you never get over it: if you could, you were never really a Marine in the first place but may have faked it for awhile.]
 

Again, Happy Birthday: Semper Fi.  We Honor you, as you have Honored and graced us with you service.
 
 
                                                                             +≠&
 

 
Publishers' Note: this piece was written by "our" Marine for the blog, and expanded the next year, as part of a string of entries to the blog.  The series is in the Archives and here.
 
 
November 10, 2011

 


Happy Birthday, Marines!

 


Those who’ve read the last few days entries into this blog will please note that this is a difference between veterans that is of consequence.  While every Marine is a veteran, not every veteran is a Marine.  As noted yesterday, Marines make up less than 10% of the living vets in this country today.

 

Now, the Navy has a birthday in October: the Air Force in mid-September; and the Army shares its birthday with everybody in the country, letting everybody celebrate Flag Day.  And I have to confess that I do not know if those birthdays are seen as a big deal by those services.

 

But the Marine Corps Birthday is a very big deal for Marines.  It is essentially a High Holy Day in The Corps.  Perhaps because The Corps has played touch-n-go with its own end so many times in its history [and may be about to do so once again; budgets have never been kind to The Corps…which could, at least in part, explain why, up to 1970 or so and perhaps beyond, The Corps always ran essentially under budget, returning funds at the end of the year].  The Marine Corps Birthday is observed and celebrated throughout The Corps and even has its own traditions (The Corps is very big on Tradition).

 

The Marine Corps Birthday is November 10th.  So, when folk insist on disrespect for the end of WWI by fudging the date for Armistice Day and crowding into November 10th, they are also giving away the Birthday party held for the millions of members of a very special club, United States Marines.

 

Now, in many families it’s just fine to celebrate a birthday on a day that is not necessarily the specific date but more convenient or practical for the family in general.  Not all families operate that way, but certainly some do.  In such situations, it is usually with the permission of the individual most immediately concerned; the birthday girl or boy.

 

But The Corps takes The Birthday seriously […or did: some actions in recent years suggest a lapse].  While there have been assorted rewritings of history over time, for nearly a century The Corps has celebrated its birthday, in high fashion, on November 10th, the day the first Continental Marines came into being at Tun Tavern in 1775 [note: that pre-dates the Declaration of Independence, let alone The Constitution].

 

In describing The Birthday and its signature event, The Birthday Ball, in his 2001 book "Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines", Marion F. Sturkey wrote (in part):

Like the U.S. Marine Corps itself, the annual Birthday Ball has evolved from simple origins to the polished and professional functions of today. Nonetheless, one thing remains constant, the tenth day of November! This unique holiday for warriors is a day of camaraderie, a day to honor Corps and Country. Throughout the world on 10 November, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps -- the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known.

The case has been made: The Marine Corps Birthday is, and has long been, a big deal, at least to [most] Marines [General Amos; are you listening?].  And the party is for Marines, and their special guests. It is not for the population at large: not even for veterans at large; it is for Marines.  It’s our Birthday.

 

Which is part of why I get a little disquieted over the dates: November 10th is not November 11th.  And I subscribe to that stuff on this Usann.us site about language being a poor tool but the best we’ve got for communication ["Watch Your Language"]; that we must, as many of our parents taught: "Say what you mean, mean what you say".  In this case, November 11th is Veterans Day, not to be confused with November 10th, The Marine Corps Birthday: each is a specific day, with huge significance in its own right and for its own audience; and each worthy of being noted with respect throughout society at large.

 

Happy Birthday, Marines.

 

Scheduled for tomorrow; a few more comments about Veterans Day, on … Veterans Day [it’s already written: look for it early].

                                                                     +≠&

 

 
 
November 10, 2012

 

 

 

Happy 237th Birthday, Marines!  

 
 

 

For many people, this is Veterans’ Day weekend.  Many simply do not realize that today, November 10, is something of a High Holy Day to Marines, The Marine Corps Birthday; this time the 237th.  While every Marine is a veteran, not every veteran is a Marine: this is a difference between veterans that is of some consequence.  Not everybody wants to be a Marine; not everybody who wants to, gets a chance at The Title; not all who get the chance, end up winning it.  Marines make up less than 10% of the living vets in this country today, and only a fraction of 1% of the population overall.

The Navy has a birthday in October: the Air Force in mid-September; and the Army shares its birthday with everybody in the country, letting everybody celebrate its birthday as Flag Day.  As far as we know, those birthdays are not seen as anywhere near as big a deal by those services, as The Corps sees its Birthday.

The Marine Corps Birthday is a very big deal for Marines.  It is essentially a High Holy Day in The Corps.  Perhaps because The Corps has played touch-n-go with its own end so many times in its history [and may be about to do so once again, due to budget constraints; budgets have never been kind to The Corps…which could, at least in part, explain why, up to 1970 or so and perhaps beyond, The Corps always ran essentially under budget, returning funds at the end of the year].  The Marine Corps Birthday is observed and celebrated throughout The Corps and even has its own traditions (The Corps is very big on Tradition).

The Marine Corps Birthday is November 10th, making it very easy for most people in this holy-day-at-convenience society to confuse it with Veterans’ Day.  But when folk insist on disrespect for the end of WWI by fudging the date for Armistice Day  -- the original name for that day of observance --  and crowd into November 10th, they are also giving away the Birthday party held for the millions of members of that very special club, United States Marines.

Now, in many families it’s just fine to celebrate a birthday on a day that is not necessarily the specific date but more convenient or practical for the family in general.  Not all families operate that way, but certainly some do.  In such situations, it is usually with the permission of the individual most immediately concerned; the birthday girl or boy.

But The Corps takes The Birthday seriously […or did: some actions in recent years suggest a lapse].  While there have been assorted rewritings of history over time, for nearly a century The Corps has celebrated its birthday in high fashion on November 10th, the day the first Continental Marines came into being at Tun Tavern in 1775 [note: that pre-dates the Declaration of Independence, let alone The Constitution].

In describing The Birthday and its signature event, The Birthday Ball, in his 2001 book "Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines", Marion F. Sturkey wrote (in part):

Like the U.S. Marine Corps itself, the annual Birthday Ball has evolved from simple origins to the polished and professional functions of today. Nonetheless, one thing remains constant, the tenth day of November! This unique holiday for warriors is a day of camaraderie, a day to honor Corps and Country. Throughout the world on 10 November, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps -- the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known.

The case has been made: The Marine Corps Birthday is, and has long been, a big deal, at least to [most] Marines [despite somehow even a Marine General or two apparently missing the memo on occasion].  And the party is for Marines, and their special guests.  It is not for the population at large: not even for veterans at large; it is for Marines.  They  -- seemingly to a man --  look at it very personally as being their own Birthday.

Which is part of why there is sometimes a little disquiet over the dates: November 10th is not November 11th.

Here [PLUSdoesNOTequalAND Publishing], we subscribe to the stuff on this Usann.us site about language being a poor tool but the best we’ve got for communication ["Watch Your Language"]; that we must, as many of our parents taught, "Say what you mean, mean what you say".  In this case, November 11th is Veterans' Day, not to be confused with November 10th, The Marine Corps Birthday.  Each is a specific day, with huge significance in its own right and for its own audience; and each worthy of being noted with respect throughout [this] society at large.

 

 

Happy Birthday, Marines.  Semper Fi.
 
 
 

 

Now, we ask a birthday present of all Marines: please take to wearing, most if not all the time, one or more readily observed Branch of Service emblems; on hats, collars, pockets, belts and/or buckles, watches, bracelets, rings.  With respect, of course; being well-groomed, and not in a way that would pretend support for some commercial endeavor not sanctioned by HQMC.  But "fly your colors".  And when you see them, acknowledge the fact; no big show necessary, a knowing look, a respectful nod, a discrete handshake, a quiet "Semper Fi".

This country desperately needs the strengths of its warriors, and  -- as noted elsewhere on this site --  the oath of enlistment [and the corresponding one for officers] carries no expiration date.  "Once a Marine, Always a Marine" is not a trite nonsense but the obligation willingly accepted that goes along with The Title, earned.  [The one around here says you never get over it: if you could, you were never really a Marine in the first place but may have faked it for awhile.]
 

Again, Happy Birthday: Semper Fi.  We Honor you, as you have Honored and graced us with you service.
 
 

 
 
 
+≠&    
 
 
 


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